Beach, Parks and a Lake

Not only does Carolina Beach offer classic beach fun, the beach’s several parks also give visitors the chance to have one-of-a-kind beach experiences you can’t find anywhere else.  From a state park, to a lake park and even a park right on the beach that you can drive and camp on, there are lots of great ways to connect with nature and explore Carolina Beach.

HIKING, CAMPING AND VENUS FLYTRAPS

Enjoy 761 acres of natural beauty at Carolina Beach State Park featuring miles of hiking trails, camping areas and views of the Cape Fear River. The park also offers a marina with access to some of the area’s best fishing spots and is home to the rare Venus flytrap, which blooms in the park in May and is native only to a 60-mile radius of Carolina Beach. Another unique feature of the park is Sugarloaf, a 50-foot sand dune located near the bank of the Cape Fear River, where over 5,000 troops camped during the Civil War.

RECORD-SETTING LAKE

Carolina Beach Lake Park features a lake that was once noted in in the Guinness Book of World Records as being the freshwater lake closest to salt water. The 11-acre lake and park features picnic areas, an amphitheater, walking paths, a playground and more. Paddleboat rentals are also available that allow you to cruise along the lake and take in views of the park. Signature Carolina Beach events are held at the park throughout the year including the Pleasure Island Chowder Cook-Off and Free Movies at the Lake. 

CAMPING, FISHING AND FOUR-WHEELING

Located at the north end of Carolina Beach, Freeman Park is the perfect spot to go fishing, crabbing, swimming or boating. Four-wheel drive vehicles and camping are also permitted in the park with daily, annual, and seasonal passes available for purchase. For overnight camping information, rules, regulations, availability and reservations, please click here.

SAVING SEA TURTLES

Loggerhead sea turtles nest on Carolina Beach during the summer and the Pleasure Island Sea Turtle Project works to protect this threatened species. Protected by the Endangered Species Act, volunteers monitor the beaches from May to August for their nests. The organization also strives to educate the public by hosting a Turtle Talks program during the summer and other programs throughout the year.